popular Navigators of Dune: Book Three of the Schools of Dune popular Trilogy (Dune, online 10) online

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A New York Times bestseller, Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson''s Navigators of Dune is the climactic finale of the Great Schools of Dune trilogy, set 10,000 years before Frank Herbert''s classic Dune.

The story line tells the origins of the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood and its breeding program, the human-computer Mentats, and the Navigators (the Spacing Guild), as well as a crucial battle for the future of the human race, in which reason faces off against fanaticism. These events have far-reaching consequences that will set the stage for Dune, millennia later.

About the Author

Brian Herbert, son of Frank Herbert, wrote the definitive biography of his father, Dreamer of Dune, which was a Hugo Award finalist. Brian is president of the company managing the legacy of Frank Herbert and is an executive producer of the motion picture Dune, as well as of the TV series Dune: The Sisterhood. He is the author or coauthor of more than forty-five books, including multiple New York Times bestsellers, has been nominated for the Nebula Award, and is always working on several projects at once. He and his wife, Jan, have traveled to all seven continents, and in 2019, they took a trip to Budapest to observe the filming of Dune.

Kevin J. Anderson has written dozens of national bestsellers and has been nominated for the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and the SFX Readers’ Choice Award. His critically acclaimed original novels include the ambitious space opera series The Saga of Seven Suns, the epic fantasy trilogy Wake the Dragon, steampunk adventures Clockwork Angels and Clockwork Lives (with legendary Rush drummer Neil Peart), as well as the thrillers Stake and Kill Zone (with Doug Beason). He is the publisher of WordFire Press and the director of the graduate program in publishing for Western Colorado University. He also set the Guinness-certified world record for the largest single-author book signing.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
802 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

atreides
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
And the Dune series comes to a train wreck ending.
Reviewed in the United States on November 7, 2016
First let me just say as I always do with these reviews, I like some of Brian’s and Kevin’s books about Dune. Butlerian Jihad, Machine Crusade, House Atreides, House Corrino, and House Harkonnen are all amazing books that get dismissed too quickly. That said, the... See more
First let me just say as I always do with these reviews, I like some of Brian’s and Kevin’s books about Dune. Butlerian Jihad, Machine Crusade, House Atreides, House Corrino, and House Harkonnen are all amazing books that get dismissed too quickly.

That said, the last 3 books, Sisterhood of Dune, Mentats of Dune, and now this monstrosity Navigators of Dune are all utter crap. My guess is that Brian and Kevin spent way too much time writing their other books instead of focusing on the last few Dune books. Here are just a few of the things wrong with this last book. Spoilers are coming.

- They spent the last 3 books doing what I call filler. They constantly, and I mean constantly re-hash what has previously happened. 40% of this book is just them re-hashing everything in the previous book/books ad nausea. Yes, we are all aware what just happened in the book 5 chapters ago, YOU JUST WROTE IT. Utterly lazing writing.

- There is ZERO character development in the third book. NOTHING!

- Vorian Atreides. Clearly the most important protagonist of the last several books and they end his story with him limping away in disgrace. Something an Atreides would never do. What in the seven hells possessed them to utterly ruin this character?

- Venport. For the universe''s most successful, smartest businessman they wrote him laughably bad. Mistake, after mistake, after mistake. A man who trapped the entire known universe in a complicated web of commerce wouldn''t have made half the mistakes he made.

- Draigo Roget. A mentat, who offered very little in terms of advice for Venport. All defensive thinking, no offensive thinking, no multiple moves ahead as a REAL mentat would do. Did Kevin/Brian forget what the heck a mentat was?

- Norma Cenva. Besides Vorian, this character breakdown hurt the most. Norma''s character development in the previous books was wonderful. An imperfect girl who becomes a beautiful women under the vicious torture of a cymek. A woman who becomes the most advanced human being ever known, maybe even more than a Kwisatz Haderach. A women who valued her family over everything. They take that character and reduce her to a handful of lines, all simple navigator speak. No depth and too boot, she abandons Venport. What a waste.

- In Closing. This book is bad and Brian/Kevin should feel bad.
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athenenike
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nothing Great
Reviewed in the United States on November 15, 2016
If you enjoy the Dune books after Frank Herbert passed, then this is more for you to read. It is not great literature and the characters have little to no depth, personality or growth. But I do kind of enjoy the world and finding out what happens in it. Even so,... See more
If you enjoy the Dune books after Frank Herbert passed, then this is more for you to read. It is not great literature and the characters have little to no depth, personality or growth. But I do kind of enjoy the world and finding out what happens in it.

Even so, there were multiple times I really wished sandworms would eat everyone in the cast. Everyone. Valya is a horror, Vor never learns, Roderick/Josef/Manford are extremists and on and on. Sandworms could have had them all and I would have been ok with it.
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AUSTIN
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
They aren’t Frank Herbert
Reviewed in the United States on September 3, 2019
I have read everything these two have done since 2003 in the Dune universe. They have a shallow grasp of how politics, economics, warfare, and the human race in general act and move. Their writing is laborious and overly drawn out. This book was a particular... See more
I have read everything these two have done since 2003 in the Dune universe. They have a shallow grasp of how politics, economics, warfare, and the human race in general act and move. Their writing is laborious and overly drawn out. This book was a particular disappointment as the main characters were shallow and took unbelievably stupid courses of action. Also for an Imperium with Trillions of people, the book shows zero sense of that scope. Anderson did just about the same dismal job any time he wrote for the Star Wars franchise and the only one of his own books I read was horrible. What Frank Herbert did stands up there with Isaac Asimov. That’s the only reason I keep coming back to these books. Too bad Frank left it unfinished. His other books are equally amazing.
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R. Christopher
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Felt like a wasted opportunity. In the end expanded next to nothing.
Reviewed in the United States on June 10, 2017
Waste of time. I have now read 9 of Brain Herbert Dune books. Years ago I read the Frank books. Then shortly after that the original Houses trilogy came out. I read those. They were nowhere near as good as Frank H''s writing, but still enjoyable. It still felt like the Dune... See more
Waste of time. I have now read 9 of Brain Herbert Dune books. Years ago I read the Frank books. Then shortly after that the original Houses trilogy came out. I read those. They were nowhere near as good as Frank H''s writing, but still enjoyable. It still felt like the Dune universe and gave us fans some insight. Years and years had passed and recently I decided to read every Dune book in order. I finished the machine war trillogy. It was okay....not as good as the Houses trillogy. Then I was super excited to read the great schools trillogy. We finally get some insight about the Spacing Guild, the Mentats, etc. But we don''t!!! Three books of potential all wasted culminating in the biggest waste of them all. Navigators. The Mentats school is destroyed and we have no idea how they become what they are in Frank''s Dune. The Spacing Guild is formed and explained in THREE paragraphs!!! No mention or anything that leads to CHOAM or the Sadukar. The Bene G''s origins make almost no sense and it''s impossible to see how they become the order we know in later books. Their origin story is probably probably the most revealing, but then in Navigators they turn into something that doesn''t begin to resemble the Bene G we know in Dune. And it''s just left at that. Huge moments occur in this book in mere paragraphs. A huge revalation caused by a major death just happens like poof. And then it''s over. It should have been this slow methodical transformation/realization, but then after this certain character we follow for a very long just suddenly dies. It''s like... Okay I guess I see his transformation. But it was handled with all the Elegance of a 3 years olds first bucket of Play-Doh. In the end I''m left with almost no insight in the origins of the entities that make up later Dune books. The moment I finished this disappointing book I picked up to read (for the second time, but in order) House Atreides. It made me realize oh my how far Brain H. Has fallen. The writing style and imagery is light years ahead of his later books. It almost... Almost feels like Frank''s books. I am going to race through​ the House books to get to Frank''s. Skip over all those other short stories and shoe horned in-between books that Brian wrote. And pray that Dune 8 and 9 are closer the the house trillogy than they are the machine wars and great schools trillogys.
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Anthony Perry
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A decent enough wrap up
Reviewed in the United States on March 4, 2017
I know the Brian Herbert books have drawn a lot of heat from the purists out there, and to be honest I understand where they''re coming from. However I did my best to view them as they are; supplements meant to further flesh out a universe we''ve all grown to love.... See more
I know the Brian Herbert books have drawn a lot of heat from the purists out there, and to be honest I understand where they''re coming from. However I did my best to view them as they are; supplements meant to further flesh out a universe we''ve all grown to love.

The problem with prequels; and why I''ve come to realize I intensely dislike them; is that you''ve already finished the story in your mind. You''ve already connected the dots and are just kinda going through the motions. You look and say "well that character isn''t in the original. They''ve''ve got to die somehow. " I''ve found this hurts the story, and I''ve seen that happen a lot with the Star Wars movies. This story is no different. You know some things have to wrap up in some cases but not completely in others.

As for the characters that were written off, I''d say it was satisfying enough. Manford''s fate was...eh, if you can overlook the fact that you''ve read it before, you shouldn''t be too disappointed. The clash between Venport and Roderick seemed to reach epic proportions of ludicrous. It''s really hard to believe two people could have this many misunderstandings this many times, especially with a Truth sayer present. I found the resolution to be bizarre to say the least. It seemed they were both favorite characters the authors simply didn''t want to part with.

The feud between Vorian and Valya was especially tricky. The authors were tasked with putting a close on problem that would somehow have to last for the eight or so millenia? I knew that would be a stretch and their solution was about what I''d expected.

Now for Erasmus. Sigh it''s been quite a journey for me with this character. From the moment he stabbed that cook to death til now I''ve nursed a particular dislike for this character. I''ve hated him at sometimes and others, I''ve simply grit my teeth at him. I can''t say I loathed him the way I did Manford, but he definitely stood out as the villian you''d have to endure. I wasn''t particularly on board when they tried to bring out his "humanity" through Gilbertus but I went along with it as well as I could.

Well they finally bring his character to a close, and I think it''s a bit too soon to say how I feel about it. Did he deserve more? Did he deserve less? I''m not really sure. In terms of comparison his end reminded me more of Agamemnon''s than Ajax. You''ll have to decide for yourself. I know I would have been furious if they would have eked out another survival for him though.

I know it sounds like I''m being critical but I''m just trying to be subjective. I love this universe and the characters in it. I don''t think I''ll ever be "done" with Dune. While I acknowledge Brian and Kevin made choices that Frank probably never would, I appreciate their attempts to keep these characters alive. I respect their right to tell their story their way. I for one know for a fact The Force Awakens would have been vastly different if Lucas had directed that one as well. If you''re hyper critical of these novels, please try to keep that in mind.

I would recommend this book. It completes the prequel series well enough. One shouldn''t be disappointed too much.

Thanks for reading and I''ll see you out there!
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Lizzie
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Reread Dune instead
Reviewed in the United States on January 10, 2018
The top listed 1 and 2 star reviews were very accurate in my opinion. It took me 4 months to read Navigator. Having fallen in love with the original Dune in the mid seventies when I was 16 and having re-read it 2 more times that summer, I keep hoping to find a book in the... See more
The top listed 1 and 2 star reviews were very accurate in my opinion. It took me 4 months to read Navigator. Having fallen in love with the original Dune in the mid seventies when I was 16 and having re-read it 2 more times that summer, I keep hoping to find a book in the Dune series that inspires that level of awe and appreciation for the story and the writer. Navigator is not it. This 3-set schoolsl series was dismal as to story, plot development and characters.
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Cindy Winget
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Can''t believe I have actually finally finished the Dune series I began in ninth grade!
Reviewed in the United States on July 25, 2017
I have mixed feelings about this book. I love Dune (both original and prequels) and I was glad to have this intriguing trilogy, although I''ll admit that it is isn''t strictly necessary. Just more fodder for fans but enjoyable nonetheless. That being said it wasn''t a terrible... See more
I have mixed feelings about this book. I love Dune (both original and prequels) and I was glad to have this intriguing trilogy, although I''ll admit that it is isn''t strictly necessary. Just more fodder for fans but enjoyable nonetheless. That being said it wasn''t a terrible finish but I just don''t feel that it was up to the same caliber as Sisterhood or Mentats. ***Spoilers ahead*** So I definitely hated Mannford SO much! I was glad to see him finally defeated, but they left it open! They let Anari Idaho live and take over the Butlerians and turn Manford into a martyr so now I am left wondering if this group is actually not defeated and will cause future mayhem. The constant fighting and misunderstandings between Venport and Roderick, who should have clearly been allies, began to be frustrating and grow stale. I realize that they had to get Venport out of the way to make way for the global navigating system that is portrayed in the original Dune books but I think that could have been addressed in a different way. Although I will admit that it was intriguing the way that Norma Cenva chose to "rescue" her grandson. Erasmus. The dreaded Erasmus. I remember complaining to my husband while reading Mentats of Dune because I like Gilbertus Albans, but I despise Erasmus and it was hard to have both feelings when Gilbertus obviously loves him and considers him his savior, which I understand from his point of view, but I hate that guy! lol It was baffling to see his "relationship" with Anna because I was 100% convinced that he didn''t care about her other than an experiment and then all of the sudden he loves her? But then again he is knew to this new emotion and it seems likely that he wouldn''t recognize it for what it was until he realized that he was about to lose her so I actually think it was a fitting end to Erasmus. He died finally knowing, at least in part, what it meant to be human. Although I was severely disappointed that Manford never found out he was alive! I was looking forward to seeing Manford''s reaction to the news that Erasmus, due to his morbid obsession with him, was alive! And wearing a body that looked like Gilbertus no less! Anyway, the most frustrating part of this book however was the feud between the Atredies and the Harkonnens. I just didn''t feel that there was enough justification for a feud that lasted centuries. Outside of Valya, no one cared as much. Griffith was able to forgive Vor. Tula realized she had made a mistake in killing Orry. Valya should have forgiven him after she discovered what was really going on with her brother and sister and whatnot but is far to stubborn to admit defeat in that way but now that Vor is "dead" the feud should have ended and I just can''t see it having enough momentum to last as long as it did (even if Willem kills Tula and the younger brother at court) I would think it would peter out in time but at the same time there probably have been real feuds in real life that stem from such pettiness so who am I to say. I am sure Valya with get her nieces and nephews and grandchildren good and brainwashed into hating the Atredies as they grow up.
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Blake Stover
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not as good as I had hoped
Reviewed in the United States on September 29, 2017
I have, to date, read all the other Dune series by both Frank Herbert and Brian Herbert. I did not find this one as engaging as most. one of the things that I have enjoyed most about Brian Herbert''s additions to the Dune universe are that they focus on revealing the... See more
I have, to date, read all the other Dune series by both Frank Herbert and Brian Herbert. I did not find this one as engaging as most. one of the things that I have enjoyed most about Brian Herbert''s additions to the Dune universe are that they focus on revealing the historical basis for major elements of the universe, or they extend outcomes into new and interesting territory. This book didn''t really quite do either. The events in focus are a relatively minor element to later outcomes. For example, in the Butlerian Jihad, he gave the full background of Atreides and Harkonnen, the reasons for the way technology evolved in the later universe, and gradually revealed the creation of the Bene Gesserit, Fremen, Navigators, etc. But this book didn''t substantially extend or reveal major points that could not be easily deduced already. It was clearly intended to expand on the Navigators, but I don''t feel like it really added anything to them. An ok casual read, but rather than the usual pageturner where I end up staying up all night to finish, I read it much slower and at times felt like it was more chore than enjoyment.
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Top reviews from other countries

Dave
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Completely missing the mark
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 29, 2018
Maybe the authors have been back to the well of Herbert''s Dune universe once too often, for The Great Schools of Dune trilogy is really a very poor effort. Unlovable characters, plodding storylines, a minimal attempt to introduce the political intrigue that infused the...See more
Maybe the authors have been back to the well of Herbert''s Dune universe once too often, for The Great Schools of Dune trilogy is really a very poor effort. Unlovable characters, plodding storylines, a minimal attempt to introduce the political intrigue that infused the original Dune novel (and the authors'' House series) and generally slow and uninspiring writing makes this trilogy by far the worst of the authors'' efforts. No more, please.
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lgf
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing prequel
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 7, 2017
The Frank Herbert ''Dune'' series is arguably the best science fiction series ever written and his son has continued the series with a sequence of prequels together with Kevin J Anderson. Many of these prequels are excellent with exciting links to the themes devised by Frank...See more
The Frank Herbert ''Dune'' series is arguably the best science fiction series ever written and his son has continued the series with a sequence of prequels together with Kevin J Anderson. Many of these prequels are excellent with exciting links to the themes devised by Frank Herbert. However, this prequel is most disappointing: Nearly 60% of the book is repetitive of previous dialogue in earlier pages and so gets monotonous and I found myself trying to skip on as quickly as possible, so not a relaxing read. In other words it is poorly written, a great disappointment after I had eagerly looked forward to this latest (and last?) instalment. There are some interesting story lines and twists which make the last quarter of the book worth reading and this links well to Frank Herbert''s masterpiece. Navigators of Dune is a must read for ''Dune'' fans but will do little to attract new fans of the series.
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Quentin
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 9, 2016
Honestly, I gave this two stars because I felt like I couldn''t slap Dune down any further. The writing was worse than it''s ever been, chapters were not finished but ended with "..." which is a total cop out. Dune is one of my favourite books of all time, the...See more
Honestly, I gave this two stars because I felt like I couldn''t slap Dune down any further. The writing was worse than it''s ever been, chapters were not finished but ended with "..." which is a total cop out. Dune is one of my favourite books of all time, the Butlerian Jihad and the following couple of books I enjoyed. This newest set was utter garbage, once I had read it I told my family and friends to never waste their time with it.
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North2South
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Okay, but follows the pattern of recent Dune books
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 5, 2019
This book adds some background to the Dune storyline, but is also another example of the repeating style of recent books. I''m not sure there is too much left in this series. If you really enjoy the stories so far you''ll enjoy this, but don''t expect too much from the...See more
This book adds some background to the Dune storyline, but is also another example of the repeating style of recent books. I''m not sure there is too much left in this series. If you really enjoy the stories so far you''ll enjoy this, but don''t expect too much from the storyline.
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Craig
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A fantastic conclusion to the great schools trilogy
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 27, 2017
This book had everything dune about it, plans within plans, battles, heroes and arrakis. I could not put this book down as the story just flowed and I felt I was going to miss something if I did.
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