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Product Description

#1 New York Times bestselling author Sophie Kinsella returns with her trademark blend of sparkling wit and playful romance in this page-turning story of a wedding to remember—and a honeymoon to forget.
 
Lottie just knows that her boyfriend is going to propose, but then his big question involves a trip abroad—not a trip down the aisle. Completely crushed, Lottie reconnects with an old flame, and they decide to take drastic action. No dates, no moving in together, they’ll just get married . . . right now. Her sister, Fliss, thinks Lottie is making a terrible mistake, and will do anything to stop her. But Lottie is determined to say “I do,” for better, or for worse.

Praise for Wedding Night
 
“Sophie Kinsella is beloved by millions—her books are properly mood-altering. Wedding Night is funny, fast, and farcical. I loved it.”—JoJo Moyes, bestselling author of Me Before You

“[A] fun novel that’s as light and bubbly as a glass of wedding champagne.”USA Today
 
“Filled with laugh-out-loud moments, this is Sophie Kinsella at her wittiest. . . . An engrossing novel.”Bookreporter
 
“You won’t be able to stop reading. . . . The narrative gallops along with humorous scenes and great one-liners.”The Daily Mail
 
“A fast-paced, hilarious comedy [with] a charming cast of characters.”—Kirkus Reviews

Review

“Sophie Kinsella is beloved by millions—her books are properly mood-altering.  Wedding Night is funny, fast, and farcical. I loved it.” —JoJo Moyes, bestselling author of Me Before You

“[A] fun novel that’s as light and bubbly as a glass of wedding champagne.” USA Today
 
“Filled with laugh-out-loud moments, this is Sophie Kinsella at her wittiest. . . . An engrossing novel.” Bookreporter
 
“You won’t be able to stop reading. . . . The narrative gallops along with humorous scenes and great one-liners.” The Daily Mail
 
“A fast-paced, hilarious comedy [with] a charming cast of characters.” —Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Sophie Kinsella is the author of the bestselling Shopaholic series, as well as the novels Can You Keep A Secret?, The Undomestic Goddess, Remember Me?, Twenties Girl, I’ve Got Your Number, and Wedding Night. She lives in England.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Twenty Days Earlier

1

Lottie

I’ve bought him an engagement ring. Was that a mistake?

I mean, it’s not a girly ring. It’s a plain band with a tiny diamond in it, which the guy in the shop talked me into. If Richard doesn’t like the diamond, he can always turn it round.

Or not wear it at all. Keep it on his nightstand or in a box or whatever.

Or I could take it back and never mention it. Actually, I’m losing confidence in this ring by the minute, but I just felt bad that he wouldn’t have anything. Men don’t get the greatest deal out of a proposal. They have to set up the occasion, they have to get down on one knee, they have to ask the question, and they have to buy a ring. And what do we have to do? Say “yes.”

Or “no,” obviously.

I wonder what proportion of marriage proposals end in a “yes” and what proportion end in a “no”? I open my mouth automatically to share this thought with Richard—then hastily close it again. Idiot.

“Sorry?” Richard glances up.

“Nothing!” I beam. “Just . . . great menu!”

I wonder if he’s bought a ring already. I don’t mind, either way. On the one hand, it’s fabulously romantic if he has. On the other hand, it’s fabulously romantic to choose one together.

It’s a win-win.

I sip my water and smile lovingly at Richard. We’re sitting at a corner table overlooking the river. It’s a new restaurant on the Strand, just up from the Savoy. All black-and-white marble and vintage chandeliers and button-back chairs in pale gray. It’s elegant but not showy. The perfect place for a lunchtime proposal. I’m wearing an understated bride-to-be white shirt, a print skirt, and have splashed out on stay-up stockings, just in case we decide to cement the engagement later on. I’ve never worn stay-up stockings before. But, then, I’ve never been proposed to before.

Ooh, maybe he’s booked a room at the Savoy.

No. Richard’s not flash like that. He’d never make a ridiculous, out-of-proportion gesture. Nice lunch, yes; overpriced hotel room, no. Which I respect.

He’s looking nervous. He’s fiddling with his cuffs and checking his phone and swirling the water round in his glass. As he sees me watching him, he smiles too.

“So.”

“So.”

It’s as though we’re speaking in code, skirting around the real issue. I fiddle with my napkin and adjust my chair. This waiting is unbearable. Why doesn’t he get it over with?

No, I don’t mean “get it over with.” Of course I don’t. It’s not a vaccination. It’s . . . Well, what is it? It’s a beginning. A first step. The pair of us embarking on a great adventure together. Because we want to take on life as a team. Because we can’t think of anyone else we’d rather share that journey with. Because I love him and he loves me.

I’m getting misty-eyed already. This is hopeless. I’ve been like this for days, ever since I realized what he was driving at.

He’s quite heavy-handed, Richard. I mean, in a good, lovable way. He’s direct and to the point and doesn’t play games. (Thank God.) Nor does he land massive surprises on you out of the blue. On my last birthday, he hinted for ages that his present was going to be a surprise trip, which was ideal because I knew to get down my overnight bag and pack a few things.

Although, in the end, he did catch me out, because it wasn’t a weekend away, as I’d predicted. It was a train ticket to Stroud, which he had biked to my desk with no warning, on my midweek birthday. It turned out he’d secretly arranged with my boss for me to have two days off, and when I finally arrived at Stroud, a car whisked me to the most adorable Cotswold cottage, where he was waiting with a fire burning and a sheepskin rug laid out in front of the flames. (Mmm. Let’s just say that sex in front of a roaring fire is the best thing ever. Except when that stupid spark flew out and burned my thigh. But never mind. Tiny detail.)

So this time, when he began dropping hints, again they weren’t exactly subtle indications. They were more like massive signposts plonked in the road: I will be proposing to you soon. First he set up this date and called it a “special lunch.” Then he referred to a “big question” he had to ask me and half winked (to which I feigned ignorance, of course). Then he started teasing me by asking if I like his surname, Finch. (As it happens, I do like it. I don’t mean I won’t miss being Lottie Graveney, but I’ll be very happy to be Mrs. Lottie Finch.)

I almost wish he’d been more roundabout and this was going to be more of a surprise. But, there again, at least I knew to get a manicure.

“So, Lottie, have you decided yet?” Richard looks up at me with that warm smile of his, and my stomach swoops. Just for an instant I thought he was being super-clever and that was his proposal.

“Um . . .” I look down to hide my confusion.

Of course the answer will be “yes.” A big, joyful “yes.” I can still hardly believe we’ve arrived at this place. Marriage. I mean, marriage! In the three years Richard and I have been together, I’ve deliberately avoided the question of marriage, commitment, and all associated subjects (children, houses, sofas, herbs in pots). We sort of live together at his place, but I still have my own flat. We’re a couple, but at Christmas we go home to our own families. We’re in that place.

After about a year, I knew we were good together. I knew I loved him. I’d seen him at his best (the surprise birthday trip, tied with the time I drove over his foot by mistake and he didn’t shout at me) and his worst (obstinately refusing to ask for directions, all the way to Norfolk, with broken sat nav. It took six hours). And I still wanted to be with him. I got him. He’s not the show-offy kind, Richard. He’s measured and deliberate. Sometimes you think he’s not even listening—but then he’ll come to life so suddenly, you realize he was alert the whole time. Like a lion, half asleep under the tree but ready for the kill. Whereas I’m a bit more of a gazelle, leaping around. We complement each other. It’s Nature.

(Not in a food-chain sense, obviously. In a metaphorical sense.)

So I knew, after a year, he was The One. But I also knew what would happen if I put a foot wrong. In my experience, the word “marriage” is like an enzyme. It causes all kinds of reactions in a relationship, mostly of the breaking-down kind.

Look at what happened with Jamie, my first long-term boyfriend. We’d been happily together for four years and I just happened to mention that my parents got married at the same age we were (twenty-six and twenty-three). That was it. One mention. Whereupon he freaked out and said we had to take “a break.” A break from what? Until that moment we’d been fine. So clearly what he needed a break from was the risk of hearing the word “marriage” again. Clearly this was such a major worry that he couldn’t even face seeing me, for fear that my mouth might start to form the word again.

Before the “break” was over, he was with that red-haired girl. I didn’t mind, because by then I’d met Seamus. Seamus, with his sexy Irish lilting voice. And I don’t even know what went wrong with him. We were besotted for about a year—crazy all-night-sex nothing-else-in-life-matters besotted—until all of a sudden we were arguing every night instead. We went from exhilarating to exhausting in about twenty-four hours. It was toxic. Too many state-of-the-nation summits about “Where are we heading?” and “What do we want from this relationship?” and it wore us both out. We limped on for another year, and when I look back, it’s as though that second year is a big black miserable blot in my life.

Then there was Julian. That lasted two years too, but it never really took. It was like a skeleton of a relationship. I suppose both of us were working far too hard. I’d recently moved to Blay Pharmaceuticals and was traveling all over the country. He was trying to get partnership at his accountancy firm. I’m not sure we ever even broke up properly—we just drifted apart. We meet up occasionally, as friends, and it’s the same for both of us—we’re not quite sure where it all went wrong. He even asked me out on a date a year or so ago, but I had to tell him I was with someone now and really happy. And that was Richard. The guy I really do love. The guy sitting opposite me with a ring in his pocket (maybe).

Richard is definitely better-looking than any of my other boyfriends. (Maybe I’m biased, but I think he’s gorgeous.) He works hard as a media analyst, but he’s not obsessed. He’s not as rich as Julian, but who cares? He’s energetic and funny and has an uproarious laugh that makes my spirits lift, whatever mood I’m in. He calls me “Daisy,” ever since we went on a picnic where I made him a daisy chain. He can lose his temper with people—but that’s OK. No one’s perfect. When I look back over our relationship, I don’t see a black blot, like with Seamus, or a blank space, like with Julian. I see a cheesy music video. A montage, with blue skies and smiles. Happy times. Closeness. Laughter.

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3.9 out of 53.9 out of 5
3,493 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Robin O. Harris
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An Amusing Story?
Reviewed in the United States on June 26, 2016
Sophie Kinsella usually writes very cute, romantic, funny books. This book is not really very funny and I am not sure why not. The storyline could be funny. Lottie believes her boyfriend of four years, Richard, is going to propose. He has given her every indication that... See more
Sophie Kinsella usually writes very cute, romantic, funny books. This book is not really very funny and I am not sure why not. The storyline could be funny. Lottie believes her boyfriend of four years, Richard, is going to propose. He has given her every indication that this is "it": planned a ."very special" lunch where he intends to ask her "an important question." When it turns out marriage was not what he had in mind; was in fact the furthest thing from his mind, Lottie breaks off the relationship. Her sister, Fliss (in the grips of a painfully contentious divorce), knows that after a break up, Lottie always does something stupid: gets a tattoo, shaves her head, makes what the sisters refer to as an "unfortunate" decision, so she goes into full alert mode. Within two days, Lottie''s first love, Bill, appears and asserts their pact to marry if both of them are still single at 30, and Lottie''s planning her wedding! The lengths Fliss, Richard, and Bill''s best man go to to try and prevent the marriage, and after failing that, to prevent the consummation of the marriage, should be funny. Unfortunately it all falls a little flat. Kinsella throws everything into the mix: from an old man Bill and Lottie revered during their first young love affair revealed as a drunk admonishing everyone not to try revisiting their youth, to a mysterious billionaire wanting to purchase Bill''s company, and Fliss involving the hotel staff in a nefarious scheme to prevent the newlyweds having sex, but it just becomes too much for me. Maybe some readers will find this novel amusing, but it missed the mark for me. I will not give up on Kinsella though as I have previously found her stories amusing and I am sure I will again.
13 people found this helpful
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No pen name
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Shockingly pathetic attempt at writing by an author who has had excellent prior books. Don''t waste your money on this book!
Reviewed in the United States on September 27, 2014
If I could give this book zero stars, I would. Sophie Kinsella has written many books that have zany characters but the stories are well thought out, humorous and fun to read. The fact that this book got published at all should be deeply embarrassing to both Ms. Kinsella... See more
If I could give this book zero stars, I would. Sophie Kinsella has written many books that have zany characters but the stories are well thought out, humorous and fun to read. The fact that this book got published at all should be deeply embarrassing to both Ms. Kinsella and her publisher. The plot is stupid, the characters are weak and ill-conceived, the direction of where the story is going is apparent very early on, and on top of all that, it is VERY poorly written. The only reason I finished this book is because I have a rule for myself that if I spend money on a book, I have to read the whole thing. The depth of the flawed nature is illustrated so glaringly in how Ms. Kinsella portrays the main character''s son, and in how she portrays ALL characters at the Greek resort. The 7 year old child acts and speaks like a three year old - Ms. Kinsella must either have no idea what children are like, or she was writing so fast to make a buck based on her prior work that she just didn''t care. The characterization of the resort staff is just plain inane. DON''T WASTE YOUR MONEY ON THIS BOOK! If you enjoyed Ms. Kinsella''s earlier books, you''re too smart for this one.
20 people found this helpful
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Stephanie
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It was ok.
Reviewed in the United States on June 27, 2014
This book was slightly different than what I was expecting from a Sophie Kinsella novel. She actually writes this book in several POV''s. The book is written primarily in the POV of two sisters. Lottie and Fliss. Lottie is the flighty younger sister who gets... See more
This book was slightly different than what I was expecting from a Sophie Kinsella novel. She actually writes this book in several POV''s.

The book is written primarily in the POV of two sisters. Lottie and Fliss. Lottie is the flighty younger sister who gets herself into crazy situations because she makes terrible choices when she''s depressed about being dumped. Fliss is the older more responsible sister who is more of a control freak and is going through a bitter divorce.

The story flip flops between the two POV''s as Lottie dumps her boyfriend because he didn''t propose to her. So she decides to marry an old flame that she has just reconnected with and it''s only been two weeks since she broke up with her ex-boyfriend. Fliss comes in and tries to stop her sister from a horrible future. It''s a bit of a crazy story with a lot going on and of course hilarity ensues because I did laugh out loud several times while reading the book.

Overall, I thought the story was okay. I really did not like Lottie at all. I could not warm up to her character. She was annoying and stupid and completely blinded by her thoughts and actions. It just got on my nerves. I actually really liked the story of Fliss and what she goes through on this journey to help save her sister. Fliss of course makes some terrible decisions of her own but she was more likable and more relate-able as a character.
6 people found this helpful
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MichelleBookAddict
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Revisiting Ones Youth
Reviewed in the United States on July 20, 2013
Wedding Night by Sophie Kinsella. 5★ ♥♥ "Youth is still where you left it, and that''s where it should stay. Anything that was worth taking on life''s journey, you''ll already have taken with you." I absolutely loved this book. I loved both Lottie and... See more
Wedding Night by Sophie Kinsella. 5★ ♥♥

"Youth is still where you left it, and that''s where it should stay. Anything that was worth taking on life''s journey, you''ll already have taken with you."

I absolutely loved this book. I loved both Lottie and Fliss''s life. I think this is Sophie''s first book with 2 character''s point of view (both sisters). And normally I don''t feel connected to the divorced-single-mom. But Fliss''s bitterness, etc., over the divorce was quiet realistic. And Lottie. Well I agree (slight spoiler) that one should never try to return to their youth times. And I laughed out loud quite a bit at some of the "honeymoon from hell" scenes.

A really good Kinsella book. I think it''s better then I''ve Got Your Number.

Also, in regard to this book being contemporary fiction, well... it''s Sophie Kinsella and Brit humor. This may be a rom-com, but Sophie tries her best to help her readers relate to the characters. Sometimes she goes to the extreme of today''s woman *cough Shopaholic* but these stand alone books are good.

Wedding Night also has me thinking what it would be like to revisit some of my youth favorite vacation spots. There''s places that I''ve enjoyed so much that I''ll tell others that it''s a must to add to places to go and see. So now I''m questioning what it would be like to go back to those places. And how much the place has changed as well as myself.

Questions of how much I have changed since the last time I''ve been there and if the place has changed at all. Even childhood camping places because we''re still telling people about them. Like Leo Carrillo State Beach in Malibu, California. We love that place when we were kids. Camping and swimming at the ocean... such fun. What would it be like to revisit it? Hmmmm...
2 people found this helpful
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Kimberly Weiss
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Recommended for Britcom fans
Reviewed in the United States on May 19, 2013
I read some of the negative reviews, and at first I agreed with them. I had a hard time getting into the book at first, and I found the sisters unsympathetic in a way. There was no reason to empathize or sympathize with them--they had successful dream jobs, and were... See more
I read some of the negative reviews, and at first I agreed with them. I had a hard time getting into the book at first, and I found the sisters unsympathetic in a way. There was no reason to empathize or sympathize with them--they had successful dream jobs, and were apparently so beautiful that they could hook up with any man at any time. A lot of time was spent establishing that they were rather, if not promiscuous exactly, then able to be overcome with lust very easily. The single mom character even carried around condoms in her purse and used them with a near stranger. The other sister, like Samantha on "SATC," had to hide her sex toys from the maid. While I don''t expect Sophie Kinsella heroines to be like Beverly Lewis heroines (Amish virgins, that is), this seemed excessive and unnecessary to some extent. I was ready to agree with the others that this was a disappointment.

Once the main part of the book started (and it took a while), I realized something, though: this is not supposed to be a romantic comedy like "When Harry Met Sally" but a silly British sex farce like "Are You Being Served?" And like that show, while it is somewhat farfetched and stupid, it is also very, very funny in parts. As I read on, I realized something else: as the characters personalities developed, it became very touching as well. It reminded me a little of a Christmas movie like "Elf"--very slapsticky until the end where it gets more sentimental.

So do I recommend this book? Well, if you''re looking for a serious work of women''s fiction about starting over, etc., then no. Stick to Luanne Rice or Elin Hildebrand. But if you want a truly funny but somewhat naughty book with a little tearjerking at the end, I can''t recommend it enough. Believe me, if I compare something to "Elf" or "Are You Being Served?", it is high praise.
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Stephanie Granger
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you are already a Sophie Kinsella fan...
Reviewed in the United States on May 30, 2013
I''ve only read one other Sophie Kinsella novel (well I actually listened), which was "I''ve Got You''re Number" and I loved it. Only Sophie Kinsella can work slapstick comedy meets 90s sitcom into a modern day story and make me smile instead of roll my eyes at the... See more
I''ve only read one other Sophie Kinsella novel (well I actually listened), which was "I''ve Got You''re Number" and I loved it. Only Sophie Kinsella can work slapstick comedy meets 90s sitcom into a modern day story and make me smile instead of roll my eyes at the absurdity of it all. So when I heard she had a novel set in Greece being released 6 weeks before my summer vacation there, I was more than thrilled! In fact, other than what I gathered from looking at the cover, I didn''t know a thing about the novel going into it. Well about 30% through the book I became a bit disappointed with "Wedding Night". It was turning into the bad version of a sitcom when you start yelling at the TV, "just spit it out!" as the characters dance around each other in confusion without realizing they aren''t talking about the same thing. But I must say I am glad I stuck with "Wedding Night" because it was a great ride, fun and funny, smart, maybe a bit predictable, but it left me smiling and a bit misty eyed. I''m glad I read it.
One person found this helpful
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Angela Risner The Sassy Orange
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Cute
Reviewed in the United States on July 25, 2013
Wedding Night follows sisters Lottie and Fliss. Lottie, the younger of the two, has the attention span of a ferret and is always going from one extreme to the next. She is sure that her boyfriend of three years, Richard, is going to propose. When he doesn''t, she runs... See more
Wedding Night follows sisters Lottie and Fliss. Lottie, the younger of the two, has the attention span of a ferret and is always going from one extreme to the next. She is sure that her boyfriend of three years, Richard, is going to propose. When he doesn''t, she runs into her boyfriend of 15 years ago and decides to get married immediately. This sends older sister Fliss into a tailspin, as she tries to make sure that Lottie doesn''t make a mistake she''ll live to regret. Fliss herself is going through a painful divorce.

I really enjoyed the story. While Lottie was incredibly annoying at the beginning of the book, she kind of grew on me by the end. I liked the character of Fliss and enjoyed her schemes to keep Lottie from marrying in haste. As far as Kinsella characters go, Lottie and Fliss are MUCH more likeable than Shopaholic''s Becky.

Will it change your life? Of course not - that''s not what Kinsella writes. She''s writing so that you can pass the time at the beach or the airport.

Recommend.
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Kate B.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fun story, give it a chance
Reviewed in the United States on June 9, 2016
I read some of the reviews before reading this book and am glad I gave it a chance, despite the mixed reviews. I personally really enjoyed this book and got through it very quickly. It is a little different than her past books since the characters are a little older, and... See more
I read some of the reviews before reading this book and am glad I gave it a chance, despite the mixed reviews. I personally really enjoyed this book and got through it very quickly. It is a little different than her past books since the characters are a little older, and there are two main characters.

I really liked the two different points of view. I would get carried away along with Lottie, then could totally see the logo and reasoning the Fliss brought. I liked having them go back and forth. They are very different people and it was a neat technique for the author to try.

I liked both women in the story. I know some people said they didn''t like either character and that they were both idiotic. But I thought Lottie and Floss were both relatable, and I could understand why they did what they did. I enjoyed hearing about both their stories. The whole concept for the book was pretty funny as well.

Overall I really enjoyed it. If you aren''t sure whether to read it because of the reviews, I would at least give it a try.
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Top reviews from other countries

Antony Simpson
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Book Review: Wedding Night by Sophie Kinsella
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 18, 2014
In Wedding Night by Sophie Kinsella we meet sisters Lottie and Fliss. Lottie is sure Richard her boyfriend is about to propose, but when he doesn’t Lottie ends the relationship. Then Ben, Lottie’s first love from 15 years ago gets back in touch and tells her that he’s never...See more
In Wedding Night by Sophie Kinsella we meet sisters Lottie and Fliss. Lottie is sure Richard her boyfriend is about to propose, but when he doesn’t Lottie ends the relationship. Then Ben, Lottie’s first love from 15 years ago gets back in touch and tells her that he’s never stopped loving her. He drunkenly proposes and she agrees to marry him with one condition: no sex until the Wedding Night. Fliss is going through a difficult divorce and adjusting to being a single mother to her son Noah. The divorce is making Fliss bitter and she’s starting to feel that getting married to Daniel was the worst mistake she ever made; Noah being the only good thing to come out of the marriage. Fliss receives a call from Lottie telling her that Richard & she have broke up and that she’s going to marry Ben. Fliss is understandabley more than a little bit concerned. Especially as Lottie has a habit of making ‘unfortunate choices’ when experiencing emotional trauma – like that time she joined a cult. Fliss decides that this marriage to Ben is another ‘unfortunate choice’ and must be stopped. When Fliss fails to stop the wedding, she puts all her efforts into stopping the Wedding Night so that the marriage can be annulled. Wedding Night is written with chapters in both Lottie and Fliss’ perspective and starts as comfortably predictable at the beginning, but as the book progresses the predictability becomes increasingly frustrating to the reader. As with all of Kinsella‘s books the element of fantasy and escapism came in the form of a very wealthy business man whose a love interest for the main character. In Lottie’s case, this was Ben. This was a missed chance for Kinsella be more creative and use a different fantasy element. The description lacked detail, relying far too much on the readers imagination. Compared to Kinsella‘s previous books, the characters in Wedding Night felt dumbed down and lacked any emotional depth. The reader gets to know Fliss a lot better than Lottie which is dissatisfying as the story is suppose to be about Lottie’s Wedding Night. Mid-way through the book Fliss decides to read Lottie’s diary. The diary Lottie wrote when she was eight-teen, when she first met Ben during her gap year on the Greek Island of Ikonos. This was a perfect opportunity to add some depth to Lottie’s character, as well as give the reader some idea of the past relationship between Lottie & Ben, but Kinsella completely missed this, much to the readers disappointment. Kinsella clearly tried to write a comedy and there were a few funny chapters; but many fell short of causing a smile, let alone a laugh. Kinsella‘s desire to write humorous chapters seemed to be at the sacrifice of the plot, which felt filmsy and put together with numerous hints that were as subtle as anvils falling from the sky. Kinsella really lost her way with this book. Wedding Night was more chick-trash than chick-lit. Kinsella is regarded as Queen of chick-lit, but if she writes another book like this she is likely to loose her crown.
25 people found this helpful
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Mrs. E. Waumsley
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Who is Andrew Bannister?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 10, 2019
Story was OK, not one of her best but I quite enjoyed it. What confused me was the contents page on the Kindle version with "Also by Andrew Bannister" as Chapter 46. It wasn''t, it was more of Sophie''s books, but someone made a boo boo. Also, I wish the publishers wouldn''t...See more
Story was OK, not one of her best but I quite enjoyed it. What confused me was the contents page on the Kindle version with "Also by Andrew Bannister" as Chapter 46. It wasn''t, it was more of Sophie''s books, but someone made a boo boo. Also, I wish the publishers wouldn''t have the first chapter of another book as a page filler at the end. I used to read these, but then when the book actually did come out I thought I''d already read it, so didn''t buy it. I now skip it completely and get annoyed with the waste of space. Just make the book shorter!
4 people found this helpful
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Kellie
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I expected more
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 17, 2019
I have to say I’m slightly disappointed with this novel. The majority of the time chapters are made up of a a girl, trying to prevent her sister consummating her marriage. It got tedious as more unrealistic events are set in place on their honeymoon to prevent the coupling....See more
I have to say I’m slightly disappointed with this novel. The majority of the time chapters are made up of a a girl, trying to prevent her sister consummating her marriage. It got tedious as more unrealistic events are set in place on their honeymoon to prevent the coupling. I felt bored and a little annoyed when reading these section. For a book which I willingly paid for, I anticipated a far more engaging read, particularly as I am normally a fan of Sophie Kinslla. However, I have enjoyed many free books which I feel were better written and had me hooked from the off. It’s not a bad book, it is lighthearted and worth a read if you require something easy going with more intriguing characters and storyline.
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Lii Haskins
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not the best
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 12, 2020
I’m not entirely sure how I feel about this novel. I thought it was going to be a lot funnier than it was, but I didn’t find myself laughing an awful lot. I was feeling more frustrated and that I just wanted to story to end. I felt I could predict what was going to happen...See more
I’m not entirely sure how I feel about this novel. I thought it was going to be a lot funnier than it was, but I didn’t find myself laughing an awful lot. I was feeling more frustrated and that I just wanted to story to end. I felt I could predict what was going to happen next and there is nothing worse, than knowing what will happen, because then it just becomes boring. Compared to Sophie’s other books I have read, they are no where near as funny and dramatic! This one I feel she’s taken a step back and tried something new, which isn’t always a bad thing! She is a brilliant writer, but this book in particular just wasn’t it for me. 😕
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Pauline Canter
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An enjoyable read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 15, 2021
Overall I enjoyed this book. Unlike some of the reviews that I have read I did find this story had genuinely funny laugh out loud moments. But I had been reading a rather dull book that I couldn’t wait to finish so this was a breath of fresh air. Yes I agree that the author...See more
Overall I enjoyed this book. Unlike some of the reviews that I have read I did find this story had genuinely funny laugh out loud moments. But I had been reading a rather dull book that I couldn’t wait to finish so this was a breath of fresh air. Yes I agree that the author uses frequent unrealistic plot lines and there is a rather tedious emphasis on one of the character’s desire for sex but overall I was pulled along by the breezy style and quirkiness. I am not keen on the Shopaholic series I much prefer her other novels. The stories all seem a little ‘off the wall’ and the characters represent strong women and dependable heroes.
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